we hung up our lyres. Psalm 137 The Message (MSG) 137 1-3 Alongside Babylon’s rivers we sat on the banks; we cried and cried, remembering the good old days in Zion. ). Psalm 137:3-6 The Message (MSG) 137 1-3 Alongside Babylon’s rivers we sat on the banks; we cried and cried, remembering the good old days in Zion. 4-6 Oh, how could we ever sing God’s song    in this wasteland?If I ever forget you, Jerusalem,    let my fingers wither and fall off like leaves.Let my tongue swell and turn black    if I fail to remember you,If I fail, O dear Jerusalem,    to honor you as my greatest. Psalm 137 The Message Bible << Psalm 136 | Psalm 137 | Psalm 138 >> The Mourning of the Exiles in Babylon. The other is an heavy imprecation and a prophetical denunciation against the enemies of the church, unto the end of the psalm (Psa 137:7-9). The psalm is marked by a quite extraordinary vividness; it is vivid in its tenderness, vivid in its tenor. Click to see full answer. On the anniversary of America’s independence, the abolitionist leader Frederick Douglass made a biblical Psalm—Psalm 137—best known for its opening line, “By the Rivers of Babylon,… We put away our harps, hanging them on the branches of poplar trees. Alongside Babylon's rivers we sat on the banks; we cried and cried, remembering the good old days in Zion. 137 1-3 Alongside Babylon’s rivers    we sat on the banks; we cried and cried,    remembering the good old days in Zion.Alongside the quaking aspens    we stacked our unplayed harps;That’s where our captors demanded songs,    sarcastic and mocking:    “Sing us a happy Zion song!”. Copyright © 1993, 2002, 2018 by Eugene H. Peterson, The Message (MSG). 4 How can we sing the songs of the Lord(I)    while in a foreign land?5 If I forget you,(J) Jerusalem,    may my right hand forget its skill.6 May my tongue cling to the roof(K) of my mouth    if I do not remember(L) you,if I do not consider Jerusalem(M)    my highest joy. The psalmist writes from exile in what today is southern Iraq. So let us begin by looking at Psalm 137. Psalm 137:1-9. Your Name, O Lord, Endures Forever. The Message Deluxe Gift Bible, Black/Slate Leather-Look, NIV and The Message Side-by-Side Bible, Large Print: for Study and Comparison, Imitation Leather, Brown, NIV and The Message Side-by-Side Bible, Two Bible Versions Together for Study and Comparison, Large Print, The Message Raspberry Blossom, Personal Size + Topical Concordance, The Message Bible, Compact Soft leather-look, tan, The Message // REMIX 2.0, Soft Imitation Leather, Color Spectrum. The other is an heavy imprecation and a prophetical denunciation against the enemies of the church, unto the end of the Psalm. Singing to the self. The Message; Psalm 137 Psalm 137. Fruits Of Exile From God . required of us songs, and our tormentors, mirth, saying, The Jews in exile were then told to “sing us one of the songs of Zion!” (Psalm 137:1), adding further humiliation and frustration to a defeated people. The psalmist writes from exile in what today is southern Iraq. All rights reserved worldwide. Psalm 137 - Beside the rivers of Babylon, we sat and wept as we thought of Jerusalem. Psalm 137 is one of several psalms called imprecatory psalms. Psalm 137. The first is, an heavy complaint of the church, unto Ps 137:7. It shows what a strange thing the human heart is. Our tormentors insisted on a joyful hymn: “Sing us one of those songs of Jerusalem!” But how can we sing the songs of the LORD while in a pagan land? Psalm 136 Psalm 138 Singing A Song In A Strange Land. This Psalm is composed of two parts. The Message 137 1-3 Alongside Babylon’s rivers we sat on the banks; we cried and cried, remembering the good old days in Zion. Alongside the quaking aspens we stacked our unplayed harps; That's where our captors demanded songs, sarcastic and mocking: "Sing us a happy Zion song! The first part of the psalm tells the story of exile in Babylon (587-538 B.C.E. let my fingers wither and fall off like leaves. 2 On the willows # 137:2 Or poplars there. The first is, an heavy complaint of the church, unto Psa 137:1-6. Psalms 137:1 - 7. Whole Psalm. Psalm 137. 137 1-3 Alongside Babylon’s rivers    we sat on the banks; we cried and cried,    remembering the good old days in Zion.Alongside the quaking aspens    we stacked our unplayed harps;That’s where our captors demanded songs,    sarcastic and mocking:    “Sing us a happy Zion song!”. Psalm 137 is a hymn expressing the yearnings of the Jewish people during their Babylonian exile. Contributed by Steven Strickland on Apr 13, 2020. How Shall We Sing the Lord ’s Song? A reward to whoever gets back at you    for all you’ve done to us;Yes, a reward to the one who grabs your babies    and smashes their heads on the rocks! In these psalms, the author (usually David, although not in Ps. 7-9 God, remember those Edomites,    and remember the ruin of Jerusalem,That day they yelled out,    “Wreck it, smash it to bits!”And you, Babylonians—ravagers! 1 By the rivers of Babylon(A) we sat and wept(B)    when we remembered Zion. It may also have been written many years into the exile. The psalmist penned this poem while … Maré : Psalm 137 OTE 23/1 (2010), 116-128 119 The psalm not only relates the story of a specific period in Israel’s history, but it was probably utilised in the cult as an observance of lament by the exiles. The poignancy comes in its personal description of the distress of Babylonian exile; the trouble is in its terrible outburst against the oppressors. Browse Sermons on Psalm 137:1-4. 137) invokes God … Last week I began a series looking at Psalm 137. A reward to whoever gets back at you for all you've done to us; 9 Yes, a reward to the one who grabs your babies and smashes their heads on the rocks! 7-9 God, remember those Edomites,    and remember the ruin of Jerusalem,That day they yelled out,    “Wreck it, smash it to bits!”And you, Babylonians—ravagers! Bible Gateway Plus puts a library of commentaries and Greek & Hebrew language tools right in your pocket. Copyright © 1993, 2002, 2018 by Eugene H. Peterson. NIV Reverse Interlinear Bible: English to Hebrew and English to Greek. The psalmist penned this poem while … Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV® Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.® Used by permission. Psalms 137. Psalm 137 is at once one of the most poignant and most troubling of the psalms. 7 Remember, Lord, what the Edomites(N) did    on the day Jerusalem fell. Yes, a reward to the one who grabs your babies. Psalm 137 1-3 Alongside Babylon’s rivers we sat on the banks; we cried and cried, remembering the good old days in Zion. Psalm 137 is in the context of the Jewish exile in Babylon (Psalm 137:1) where they had been taken as slaves after the Babylonians burned down the city of Jerusalem. 137 1 Alongside Babylon's rivers we sat on the banks; we … -- Robert Rollock. for there our captors asked us for songs, our tormentors demanded songs of joy; they said, “Sing us … What Psalm 137 means Verses 1 – 3:The *psalmist is probably home again in Jerusalem or one of the towns near it. 3 For there our captors. In its whole form of nine verses, the psalm reflects the yearning for Jerusalem as well as hatred for the Holy City's enemies with sometimes violent imagery. | 1,641 views. S Ge 25:30; S 2Ch 28:17; S Ps 83:6; La 4:21-22, Isa 13:1, 19; 47:1-15; Jer 25:12, 26; 50:1; 50:2-51:58. 135 u Praise the L ord! 1-3 Alongside Babylon's rivers we sat on the banks; we cried and cried, remembering the good old days in Zion. The other is an heavy imprecation and a prophetical denunciation against the enemies of the church, unto the end of the Psalm. It was Israel's, or rather Judah's, exile from Zion and Jerusalem that this psalm commemorated; but the fruits that exile bore, and which are here told of, set forth the fruits of the yet sadder exile from God which many a soul has known. — Whole Psalm. Whole Psalm.—This Psalm is composed of two parts. Bible Gateway Plus puts a library of commentaries and Greek & Hebrew language tools right in your pocket. Alongside Babylon’s rivers we sat on the banks; we cried and cried, remembering the good old days in Zion. Whole Psalm. Psalm 137 – The Mournful Song of the Exiles Because this psalm is a remembrance of Babylon, many commentators believe it was written after the return from exile. Alongside the quaking aspens we stacked our unplayed harps; That’s where our captors demanded songs, sarcastic and mocking: “Sing us a happy Zion song!” Oh, how could we ever sing GOD’s song in this wasteland? Yes, a reward to the one who grabs your babies, they said, “Sing us one of the songs of Zion!”. This Psalm is composed of two parts. NIV 1 By the rivers of Babylon we sat and wept when we remembered Zion. Psalm 137. A reward to whoever gets back at you    for all you’ve done to us;Yes, a reward to the one who grabs your babies    and smashes their heads on the rocks! "For there they that carried us away captive required of us a song; and they that wasted us [required … Praise the name of the L ord, give praise, O v servants of the L ord, 2 who n stand in the house of the L ord, in w the courts of the house of our God! Whole Psalm. 4-6 Oh, how could we ever sing God’s song    in this wasteland?If I ever forget you, Jerusalem,    let my fingers wither and fall off like leaves.Let my tongue swell and turn black    if I fail to remember you,If I fail, O dear Jerusalem,    to honor you as my greatest. The first is, an heavy complaint of the church, unto Psalms 137:7. Copyright © 2019 by Zondervan. Psalm 137 is a hymn expressing the yearnings of the Jewish people during their Babylonian exile. let my fingers wither and fall off like leaves. (O)“Tear it down,” they cried,    “tear it down to its foundations!”(P)8 Daughter Babylon, doomed to destruction,(Q)    happy is the one who repays you    according to what you have done to us.9 Happy is the one who seizes your infants    and dashes them(R) against the rocks. Message uses God's dealings with Israel to teach about the love of God. What is the message of Psalm 137? New 4-Week Series: Focus. 137. If you know much about OT literature/writings, you will know that a lot of times, especially in Psalms, that the stories were written as poetic expressions of personal feelings/emotions, due to the circumstances, good or bad, that was taking place in the writers life. S. Conway . Alongside the quaking aspens we stacked our unplayed harps; That's where our captors demanded songs, sarcastic and mocking: "Sing us a happy Zion song!" … I am going to do two things with the psalm; first, I will look at the psalm, and then I would like to look through the psalm and allow it to speak to us today.. MSG 1 Alongside Babylon's rivers we sat on the banks; we cried and cried, remembering the good old days in Zion. 1 By the waters of Babylon, there we sat down and wept, when we remembered Zion. Psalm 137:1-9: Pulpit Commentary Homiletics. The psalm begins with the phrase, “By the waters of Babylon.” (C)2 There on the poplars(D)    we hung our harps,(E)3 for there our captors(F) asked us for songs,    our tormentors demanded(G) songs of joy;    they said, “Sing us one of the songs of Zion!”(H). In its whole form of nine verses, the psalm reflects the yearning for Jerusalem as well as hatred for the Holy City's enemies with sometimes violent imagery. --Robert Rollock. He remembered how the people of Babylon It made them sad … 1. A. 3 Praise the L ord, for x the L ord is good; sing to his name, y for it is pleasant! What a wonderful mixture is the Psalm of soft melancholy and fiery patriotism! For our captors demanded a song from us. Find Top Church Sermons, Illustrations, and Preaching Slides on Psalm 137:1-4. Psalm 137 The Message (MSG) 137 1-3 Alongside Babylon’s rivers we sat on the banks; we cried and cried, remembering the good old days in Zion. 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